Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic
Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic

Double-Sided Fossil Dinosaur Trackway # 2, Early Jurassic

Regular price $1,350.00 Sale

Age: 200 Million Years Old

Location: Connecticut River Valley, Connecticut

Species: Multiple Theropod Species (Eubrontes & Grallator)

height: 27”

width: 14”

Largest Track: Approximately 9” from heel to middle toe

*** Collected September 10th, 2019. Comes with certificate of Authenticity***

Recently and legally collected in private property along the Connecticut River Valley in Connecticut. This is a very heavy, and very busy Trackway with deep impressions! These is the fossil impressions of multiple Theropods (raptor) that existed some 200 Million Years Ago. The species that made these tracks is relatively unknown to science, but it can be said safely that these tracks were made by at least two species when comparing the size and shape. I wonder where they were off to? 

These tracks are double-sided, too! This happens when newer sediment fills in already existing footprints with a new soft layer for the Dinosaurs to walk on, creating many fossiliferous layers of sediment. On occasion when breaking the rocks open, you will have the negatives impressions made by the dinosaurs, as well as positive impressions made from previous layers. Tracks have been polished to increase visibility, though the polish can be scrubbed off with soap and water if done so carefully.

 

The Tracks:

Eubrontes ("True Thunder")

These tracks were made by a large, bipedal, carnivorous, Theropod dinosaur similar to a Dilophosaurus and are among the most common tracks found in the valley. These dinosaurs probably reached a length of 20 feet .

The animal that made these Eubrontes tracks was one of the first large meat-eating dinosaurs . Scientists studying these tracks have compared the tracks to the foot skeleton of the well-known dinosaur Dilophosaurus . They have noted that the foot skeleton of the Dilophosaurus seems to fit nicely into these footprints . Thus it is likely that an animal similar to the Dilophosaurus made the Eubrontes tracks. Dilophosaurus is best known for its role in Jurassic Park , where it ate the computer expert in the jeep. It's the valley dinosaur that went to Hollywood and made it big.

Grallator ["GRA-luh-tor"] is an ichnogenus (form taxon based on footprints) which covers a common type of small, three-toed print made by a variety of bipedal theropod dinosaurs. Grallator-type footprints have been found in formations dating from the Late Triassic through to the early Cretaceous periods. They are found in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia and China but are most abundant on the east coast of North America, especially the Triassic and Early Jurassic formations of the northern part of the Newark Supergroup. The name Grallator translates into "stilt walker", although the actual length and form of the trackmaking legs varied by species, usually unidentified. The related term "Grallae" is an ancient name for the presumed group of long-legged wading birds, such as storks and herons. These footprints were given this name by their discoverer, Edward Hitchcock, in 1858. Grallators in the Northeast United States are believed to have been made by Podokesaurus holyokensis.