Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA
Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA
Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA
Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA
Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA
Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA
Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA
Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA
Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA
Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA

Museum Quality Fossil Ferns, Two Slabs/Multiple Players, St. Clair PA

Regular price $149.99 Sale

Age: 290-310 Million Years Old

Location: St. Clair, PA

Size: 12” x 9.5” (each slab)

 

These beautiful ferns are preserved in the mineral pyrophyllite, which sometimes gives them a crisp bold white or silver appearance, and are a perfect example of how fossils are buried in layers of sediment to preserve in stacks. This is two who Slabs cracked open to reveal multiple layers of fossils. The pyrophyllite is a pyrite pseudomorph. Any orange or gold color was caused by iron ores in the ground. This unique type of preservation provides for incredible detail and sharp contrast with the gray-black silt stone shale host rock.

These natural wonders fell into a bog where a low temperature, low pressure, oxygen depleted environment evolved the plant tissue into Pyrite. Pyrophyllite(AluminumSilicate) replaced the Pyrite at an ensuing stage, creating the bold, white color. Any orange-ish color was caused by the presence of iron ore and is an entirely natural occurrence. This remarkable state of preservation is the anomaly that provide the St. Clair, Pennsylvania fern fossils their beautiful complexions. This site is no longer open for excavation those available are truly priceless.

Dozens of plant species are found in this shale, look closely. Common species include Alethopteris, Neuropteris, Pecopteris, and Sphenophyllum these carboniferous ferns died between 280 and 310 million years ago! One century can seem hard to comprehend and these fossils thrived 3 million times that long ago. Seed ferns of any kind went completely extinct around 73 million years ago, while dinosaurs were still around!

We never paint or touch them up.  Nature and time are the artists.

This would be a perfect addition to anyone's fossil collection!