Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK
Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK

Colorful MASS MORTALITY/ Iridescent Psiloceras planorbis Ammonites / UK

Regular price $1,250.00 $925.00 Sale

Age: 195 Million Years Old

Species: Psiloceras planorbis

Location: Watchet, Somerset, UK

This Fossil was Self-collected in the winter of 2019 by yours-truly on my fossil-hunting trip to the US. Aside from some Marine Reptile fossils I found, this was among one of the most unique fossils I found. The Ammonite, though flattened over the last 195 Million Years, The Shells preserved beautifully, keeping much of their iridescence (all the while being replaced with other minerals.) This is a “Mass Mortality Plate”, meaning an abundance of animals died and preserved very close together.

This is truly a gorgeous Fossil, and is looking for a good home with a new owner/collector who will love it unconditionally. Or it would, you know, if it could think for itself. But they’re dead. As they had been for 195 million years...

Ammonoids are an extinct group of marine mollusc animals in the subclass Ammonoidea of the class Cephalopoda. These molluscs, commonly referred to as ammonites, are more closely related to living coleoids than they are to shelled nautiloids such as the living Nautilus species.