Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas
Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas
Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas
Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas
Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas
Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas
Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas
Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas
Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas

Double-Sided Slab of Fossil Brachiopods from Kansas

Regular price $34.00 Sale

Self-Collected near Topeka, Kansas! Ships from Massachusetts.

This slab has a plethora of perfectly preserved Brachipod Specimens, as well as impressions of specimens that once lived and died in the sediment.

Description: Brachiopods are marine animals that secrete a shell consisting of two parts called valves. Their fossils are common in the Pennsylvanian and Permian limestones of eastern Kansas.

Brachiopods have an extensive fossil record, first appearing in rocks dating back to the early part of the Cambrian Period, about 525 million years ago. They were extremely abundant during the Paleozoic Era,reaching their highest diversity roughly 400 million years ago, during the Devonian Period. At the end of the Paleozoic, however, they were decimated in the mass extinction that marks the end of the Permian Period, about 250 million years ago. This event, known as the Permo-Triassic mass extinction, may have killed more than 90 percent of all living species. It was the largest of all extinction events (larger than the major extinction at the end of the Cretaceous that killed off the dinosaurs).

Although some brachiopods survived the end-Permian-extinction, and their descendants live in today's oceans, they never achieved their former abundance and diversity. Only about 300 to 500 species of brachiopods exist today, a small fraction of the perhaps 15,000 species (living and extinct) that make up the phylum Brachiopoda.