Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen
Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen
Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen
Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen
Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen
Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen
Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen
Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen
Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen
Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen

Natural Phantom Quartz Gem Specimen

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Phantom quartz usually occurs in rock crystal, but is also found in smoky quartz, citrine and amethyst.

Rock crystal is transparent and colorless quartz. It commonly occurs inside quartz veins where it crytallizes in rock cavities known as vugs or pockets. It also is common in vugs or pockets in pegmatite dikes. Rock crystal often occurs as secondary quartz crystals on cryptocrystalline quartz in c s and vugs, and in geodes.

Natural radiation from radioactive elements or adjacent radioactive rocks can cause rock crystal to assume a brown to gray color, known as smoky quartz. Minor iron impurities can cause rock crystal to be purple (amethyst) or yellowish-orange (citrine).

Phantom quartz crystal shapes can sometimes be seen in the interior of quartz crystals, outlining an earlier stage of the crystal's formation. These phantoms are usually composed of other minerals such as chlorite, goethite or hematite or are composed of other varieties of quartz such as milky quartz, smoky quartz or even amethyst, which form on most or all of the surfaces of the quartz crystal at a particular point in time during its growth, after which the quartz crystal resumes its crystallization enclosing the phantom crystal outline within itself.

Phantom quartz is recognized by its characteristic phantom crystal within itself. It can be identified as quartz by its crystal habit, transparency, hardness, glassy luster, conchoidal fracture, occurance and general lack of cleavage. avities and vugs, and in geodes.

Natural radiation from radioactive elements or adjacent radioactive rocks can cause rock crystal to assume a brown to gray color, known as smoky quartz. Minor iron impurities can cause rock crystal to be purple (amethyst) or yellowish-orange (citrine).

Phantom quartz crystal shapes can sometimes be seen in the interior of quartz crystals, outlining an earlier stage of the crystal's formation. These phantoms are usually composed of other minerals such as chlorite, goethite or hematite or are composed of other varieties of quartz such as milky quartz, smoky quartz or even amethyst, which form on most or all of the surfaces of the quartz crystal at a particular point in time during its growth, after which the quartz crystal resumes its crystallization enclosing the phantom crystal outline within itself.

Phantom quartz is recognized by its characteristic phantom crystal within itself. It can be identified as quartz by its crystal habit, transparency, hardness, glassy luster, conchoidal fracture, occurance and general lack of cleavage.